• Anecdotes

    HOW TO SEPARATE AN EGG

    The scene ~ a cooking workshop. The Guest of Honour ~ an employee celebrating 25 years of service. The date ~ 1995 A corporate hands-on cooking lesson followed by dinner in La Cuisine Francaise’s Salle Privee. As on many occasions it is not only the actual cooking but also the entertainment that makes an evening a success. So, as was my habit when explaining the menu to the guests, I playfully invited the Guest of Honour to join me and make a mayonnaise. After washing his hands and donning his apron, we stood next to my great culinary assistant – the Magimix Food Processor. I gave our Guest an egg…

  • Ingredients

    The Artichoke

    When and how did you first eat an artichoke? What is an artichoke? It is a variety of thistle, which has not yet flowered. I love it but can imagine, when faced with it on your plate for the first time, it can be a daunting task to eat it The whole artichoke is normally served steaming hot or cold, the latter being easier to deal with but not so tasty. It is served, more often than not, with a delicious home made hollandaise sauce or very simply with a bowl of tasty mustard mayonnaise and a dash of balsamico added to it or a simple herb vinaigrette dressing. Starving…

  • Recipes

    Summer Salad with Pasta, sautéed fresh Artichokes and pan fried Scallops

    Serves 4 Ingredients: 12 scallops 2 tbsp olive oil or 25 gram butter 2 globe artichokes Salt and pepper 100g pasta (trimmings) 50g pecorino of Parmesan cheese 1 small crop of salad, use only the inner leaves (lettuce) A few sprigs of roquette or seasonal salad Pasta (basic recipe for 100g pasta) 100 g flour 1 egg Salt A little olive oil Dressing: 1 tbsp red wine vinegar preferably not too acid ¼ tsp grated ginger ¼ tsp garlic 4 tbsp light walnut oil or a light olive oil from the Provence or Liguria Salt and pepper Chives, chervil   When frying coquilles , place in the pan one by…

  • Ingredients

    SAGE

    My passion for this woody-stemmed rather pungent, oily/waxy evergreen herb may stem from my first childhood task in the kitchen at Christmas, mixing the sage and onion stuffing for the turkey. Though its looks are a bit dowdy it packs a punch when used finely chopped in stuffing or in a winter pesto with walnuts. Deep fried sage leaves are a more modern way of using this wonderful ancient medicinal herb giving it a real whow effect, enhancing its perfume and making it edible just as it is, and it smells divine. So does your kitchen. Then use crumbled over vegetables, or in sea salt or tucked under the skin…